Summer Sale 2018

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There’s no theme to this list of sale wines except we need their places at the shop. Enjoy!

Label_FR_Nalys Blanc_squareDomaine de Nalys 2012 Châteauneuf-du-Pape Blanc
Southern Rhône, France // Reg $45.99 | 25% OFF = $34.49
This wine is at its prime, and we’re on our last case. We’ve been direct importing Domaine du Nalys since 2011. A year ago, they kindly gave us notice that they had been purchased by a much bigger winery, so Jens went about looking for a replacement. Our new line is waiting in the back room for a spot on the shelf. In the meantime, you can enjoy this wonderful wine at a killer price. Or buy it and save it for the holidays — Thanksgiving would be perfect (if you can wait)!! Complex notes of citrus & white flowers with a lovely minerality.

Label_FR_Adrien Vacher Abymes Jacquere_square_V3Adrien Vacher 2016 Abymes
Savoie, France // Reg $17.99 | 25% OFF = $13.49
From the French Alps! 100% Jacquere. Floral & fruit notes with traces of lemon, grapefruit & pineapple. Tart & lively with lush notes of honeysuckle. A hint of herbal spice on the finish.Go exploring!

Adrien Vacher 2016 Mondeuse
Savoie, France // Reg $19.99 | 25% OFF = $14.99
Black cherries with hints of currants and forest
Palate: Lighter in body, but full of flavors! Macerated raspberries, currants, cherries and black berries soaked in bay leaves and black peppercorns. Hints of sour red plums peek out from the grippy tannins but does not override the sense of oregano & thyme.

Label_FR_Haut de Mourier Viognier_square_v2Domaine Haut de Mourier 2015 Viognier

Languedoc, France // Reg $15.99 | 25% OFF = $11.99
Bouquet of apricots, peaches and violet. Peach, apple, pear, lavender and honey on the palette. Round and soft, fresh and well-balanced. Light sweetness and spicy fragrance.

Château du Grand Caumont 2015 Cuvée Tradition Corbières Blanc
Languedoc, France // Reg $14.99 | 25% OFF = $11.24
Flinty gold in color. Ripe yellow apples, white flowers on the nose. Rich baked summer apples, oil and lime citrus. Full-bodied. Wonderful food wine: white or red meat, barbecues, delicatessen meats, fish and shellfish, mixed salads, poultry, pizzas, fruit salads, summer desserts.

Label_FR_Grand Caumont Rose_squareChâteau du Grand Caumont 2016 Cuvée Tradition Corbières Rosé
Languedoc, France // Reg $14.99 | INSIDER $11.99 | 25% OFF = $8.99
Blend of Cinsault, Grenache Noir, Grenache Blanc. Salmon pink in color. Refreshing summer raspberries on the nose. Round. Fresh. Citrus, flowers, rose and white pepper notes.

Domaine de Herbauges 2014 Muscadet Côte du Granlieu Sur Lie
Loire Valley, France // Reg $14.99 | INSIDER $13.99 | 25% OFF = $10.49
Scents of light white flowers. Rich body with lemon oil as well as lemon and lime citrus, minerals and acidity.

Label_FR_Bigotiere Muscadet 2016_squareChâteau de la Bigotiere 2014 Muscadet
Loire Valley, France // Reg $14.99 | 25% OFF = $11.24
This drier style Muscadet has fresh light fruit notes with some stony qualities. Hints of lemon citrus. Oysters! 2009 Gold Medal Paris

Secret de Berticot 2016 Sauvignon Blanc
Côtes de Duras, France // Reg $13.99 | 25% OFF = $10.49
Fresh citrus- lemon, lime, grapefruit and litchi notes. Refreshing!

La Togata 2014 Barengo Toscana Rosso
Tuscany, Italy // Reg $23.99 | 25% OFF = $17.99
A baby Brunello! 100% Sangiovese. Scents of rose petals, ripe black berries. Rich and silky with notes of luscious dark cherry touting hints of tobacco and cedar box.

Label_IT_Scopone Rosso di Montalcino_squareScopone 2013 Rosso di Montalcino
Tuscany, Italy // Reg $23.99 | INSIDER $14.99 | 25% OFF = $11.24
BIG. Open the day before you want to drink it to enjoy scents of vanilla, rose petals, ripe black berries. Rich and silky with notes of luscious dark cherry fruit.

Giuseppe Savini 2016 “Rondineto” Pecorino
Abruzzo, Italy // Reg $12.99 | 25% OFF = $9.74
Luminous straw yellow. Floral with tree fruit notes. Delicate apple and pear fruit balanced with citrus with a fresh, mineral roundness.

Label_IT_Savini Montepulciano_squareGiuseppe Savini 2012 “Colleventano” Montepulciano d’Abruzzo
Abruzzo, Italy // Reg $15.99 | 25% OFF = $11.99
Violets, currants, light spice on the nose. Rich cherries , currants with light earthiness on finish. Pizza!

Palazzo Malgara 2016 Inzolia
Sicily, Italy // Reg $15.99 | 25% OFF = $11.99
Bouquet of white flowers, lemon citrus. Rich, good structure, subtle herbs, kiwi and lemon fruit.

Label_CA_Wish Cab_square_v2Wish Wine Co. 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon
North Coast, California // Reg $16.99 | INSIDER $15.99 | 25% OFF = $11.99
Black and red currants, black cherry fruit with savory characteristics including tobacco, cedar, mint and espresso.

Wish Wine Co. Red Blend
North Coast, California // Reg $16.99 | INSIDER $15.99 | 25% OFF = $11.99
Boysenberry, Asian plum and red currant. Integrated and balanced.

Wish Wine Co. 2013 Zinfandel
North Coast, California // Reg $16.99 | INSIDER $15.99 | 25% OFF = $11.99
Red plum, blackberry and blueberry, subtle tannins and refreshing acidity. This wine pairs beautifully with salty-sweet dishes such as BBQ.

And more…

Hope you can stop by & take advantage of these killer prices!
Julie & Jens, owners
Portalis Wines

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Australia 2018

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My girls are taking part in Panpapanpalya (one of the world’s largest gatherings of dancers, dance educators, and artists of all ages) through their Kaleidoscope Dance Company, and luckily for me, it takes place this year in Adelaide, Australia… handily an hour or less from the Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, and Adelaide Hills wine producing regions. So… let’s go:

Wine Folly_Australia_South Australia
map credit:  Wine Folly

Barossa Valley // Monday, July 9, 2018
First stop: Elderton
Elderton owner, Cameron Ashmead, (in black) // Winery history>
Elderton winemaker, Richard Langford (in green)

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Next up: Kalleske 
Kalleske, est. 1853 // Biodynamic wines. Best value/quality producer

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Last stop: Henschke Winery
Henschke, one of the most prestigious wineries in the Barossa Valley

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McLaren Vale // Tuesday, July 10, 2018
First stop: D’Arenberg
The Cube is D’Arenberg’s info center. Also, the craziest urinals I’ve ever seen! The sheep are at work grazing, weeding & fertilizing the vineyards!

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Stopped by Maslin Beach with Mark (one of the other dancer dads) on the way back to Adelaide:
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Cleland Wildlife Conservation Park // Wednesday, July 11, 2018
A day off dance meant a trip to see the local wildlife! A kangaroo scratches its back on the ground just like a dog, btw!

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Adelaide Hills // Thursday, July 12, 2018
First stop: Shaw+Smith Winery
David LeMire, MW, was our host.

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Next stop: Sidewood
Pinot Noir vineyards with emus! Plus Seth Piszczuk, tasting room manager and our host. 

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On the way home: Largs Bay, Western Adelaide on the coast:
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Many thanks to WineAustralia for setting up these tours! We’ve had a wonderful time!!

One more day to come… Barossa Valley again on Saturday, July 14. Stay tuned…
Jens

Wines for Spring!

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The sun is out. The evenings are warm. The gardens around Seattle are at their height of bloom and beauty. If you aren’t sitting in some fresh air enjoying a glass of wine, you should be! Need some suggestions? Here’s a great spring varietal list from Wine Folly> for under $20 a bottle. Or stop by, and we’ll hook you up — Grüner Veltliner, Malbec, Soave, Gamay, unoaked Chardonnay, Zweigelt, rosé… the list goes on!

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First & foremost… ROSÉ:
We have quite a list in stock ranging from local producers to high-end Bandol rosé from Provence. Here are our new arrivals:

Chateau Rivière Minervois Rosé 2017 // Languedoc
Domaine de Frégate Bandol Rosé 2017 // Provence
Domaine du Petit Romain Vieilles Vignes Rosé 2017 // Southern Rhône
La Malière Rosé Côtes de Provence 2017 // Provence
Ozilhan Réserve Côtes du Rhône Rosé 2017 // Southern Rhône
Paul Blisson Costières de Nîmes Rosé 2017 // Southern Rhône

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In addition, here are some great spring white varietals with our specific recommendations:
Grüner Veltliner – Aromatic white flowers. White peach, poached pear, lime blossoms, with a nice white pepper finish. Try: Weingut Prechtl 2016 Alte Reben aus Löss Grüner Veltliner // Austria (vineyards pictured)
Prié Blanc – From the highest vineyard site in the world (a few minutes from Mont Blanc), this indigenous grape is full of minerality & delight: Pavese Ermes 2016 Blanc De Morgex et de La Salle // Valle d’Aoste, Italy
Vinho Verde – light, fruity with a slight effervescence and low alcohol! Try: Vinha das Margaridas 2016 Vinho Verde // Portugal
Garganega – This white is better known as Soave, but that’s the DOC (region), not the grape… which is full of citrus blossoms, warm apples & apricots held together by refreshing acidity! Try award-winning: Franchetto 2015 Soave “La Capelina” // Veneto, Italy

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And spring reds varietals:
Bonarda lightens up the Malbec in this terrific, organic blend: La Puerta 2016 Alta Malbec/Bonarda // Argentina
Zinfandel – Its trademark velvety fruit makes this varietal a wonderful accompaniment to BBQ and other grilled summer fare. Try: Wish Wine Co. 2011 Zinfandel // North Coast, California (vineyards pictured)
Zweigelt – Lighter in body, but full of flavor: blackberries, tart dark cherries & spices! Try: Weingut Prechtl 2015 Satzen Zweigelt // Austria

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AND… don’t forget the bubbles! Go light & freshing with La Farra Prosecco — Brut, Extra Dry, Rosé & their Prosecco Superiore DOCG Valdobbiadene. Tree fruits & citrus with lively gentle bubbles! (vineyards pictured)

We’d be delighted to help you with any of your spring wine needs! Just stop in…

Julie & Jens, Owners
Portalis Wines

Art credit: Mona Anastas, owner of Two Owls in Madrona

Wine Tour of Southern Italy

Wine Folly_Italy_cropped to Southern Italy_croppedAre you ready for an adventure? It’s a new year- time to expand the horizons! Southern Italy hosts beautiful, lesser-known varietals (and regions) at reasonable prices (on both accounts). From the Amalfi Coast to the “heel” of the boot to the bounties of Sicily, Southern Italy has so much to offer with wine, cuisine, culture and travel.

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photo credit: science.howstuffworks.com

Southern Italy does not include Central Italy. Southern Italy begins at Campania and Puglia as the demographics change with Mt. Vesuvius (pictured above) and the impact of the Ionic sea and Amalfi coast. Gorgeous. One of the most dynamic and most beautiful aspects to Southern Italy is embracing that it is greatly influenced by the migrations that occurred through Greece (Rome) and the Arab eras. The cuisine, the culture, the cultivation of wine- everything began here- THEN migrated north.

Differences in cuisine begin with sardines, oil, beans, cured meats, livestock and the curing of dishes. It’s all in the transport. The southern tip has a mild Mediterranean climate which is excellent for vacation and travel; however, the land is supposedly infertile and best for wine, livestock and creativity. Why else would I pick it? Here are a few top picks for my dream adventures for 2018:

Casa Setaro_Massimo cutting grapes_FULL

Campania– A region perhaps more noted for art, culture, history, and cuisine …but the wine! If only I could eat pizza in Naples! But, rumor has it they make an amazing rabbit dish and some beautiful fish dishes. If I could get my hands on Massimo’s rosato again, we would enjoy that with colatura di alici. But as many of you know, my go to is that killer Aglianico! Massimo makes other classic wines from Campania, including the white wine Falanghina, known for flavors of citrus minerality combines with fleshy tree fruits and the lesser-known Peidrosso, more like Pinot Noir, just more dirt! [Note: Massimo Setaro (pictured above) is the owner/winemaker at Casa Setaro . We hosted him for a wonderful tasting at Portalis in 2017.]

Casa Setaro_vesuvius gravel
This is the Vesuvial gravel that makes up the dirt in Massimo’s vineyards.

Casa Setaro Falanghina
Reg $19.99 | INSIDER $14.99 | Mixed Case $11.99
Casa Setaro Piedrosso
Reg $19.99 | INSIDER $14.99 | Mixed Case $11.99

Wine Folly_Puglia

Puglia– the “heel” of Italy’s boot. Nothing could be farther from the truth when you discover the quality, diversity, the amazing cuisine and the gorgeous coastline. Salice Salento is a sub-region within Puglia that offers native plump bombastic Negroamaro or the killer Rosso that you can blind test with your Chianti Classico besties to see if they know the difference. It is not Sangiovese! It’s Malvisa Nero. And that is just a subregion. Puglia, and Southern Italy, are known for Primitivo. A varietal that has been dna proven to be related Crljenak Kasteljanski from Croatia to Zinfandel (grown in California). Puglia is HOT with Mediterranean influences… why would it not be just as killer as California if not better?

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Photo credit: nuvomagazine.com

Palazza Malgara Negroamaro
Reg $14.99 | INSIDER $13.99 | Mixed Case $11.19
Palazza Malgara Primitivo
Reg $15.99 | Mixed Case $12.79
Palazza Malgara Rosso del Salento
Reg $14.99 | INSIDER $13.99 | Mixed Case $11.19

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Sicily– The give and take of war, culture, struggle, life and wine… wait, not just Sicily? Truth, most wine regions are filled with this dynamic. Sicily is an island constantly in the midst of cultural transition. Most know Sicily for Marsala or the Italian Mafia… times change and Sicily has embraced change. The late ’90’s brought infrastructure to embrace clean winemaking techniques. Grillo, the base for Marsala, is clean, rich and refreshing. Excellent with sea bass, poultry, and rich cheeses. Inzolia, a classic native, is a bright ray of sunshine on a cloudy day. The fruits are freshing yet warm- ripe apples, soft melon, with subtle citrus. Nerello Macalese– a light bodied, hedonistic leather bomb with the abilty to convert lovers of old school Burgundy to try something new. It iss unique and worth the adventure. And many of you know my favorite Boulliabaise pairing- Nero d’Avola– not a light weight contender, nor is that dish.

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Vineyards at the Planeta estate, Sicily

Palazza Malgara Grillo
Reg $13.99 | Mixed Case $11.19
Palazza Malgara Inzolia
Reg $15.99 | INSIDER $14.99 | Mixed Case $11.19
Palazza Malgara Nerello Mascalese
Reg $15.99 | INSIDER $14.99 | Mixed Case $11.99
Palazza Malgara Nero d’Avola
Reg $14.99 | INSIDER $13.99 | Mixed Case $11.19

As with any region- culture, history, cuisine and transition- all go hand in hand to tell a vivacious story. This one is not to be ignored, and on top of that it’s affordable- for now.

I may not make it to Italy this year, but I will definitely be in Seattle soon.

Cheers!
Jaci

https://www.tripsavvy.com/the-geography-of-italy-4020744

New World Wine | Argentinian Varietals- Not Just Malbec

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Bodega Kaiken, Mendoza

On the spectrum of New World wine country (i.e., Australia, New Zealand, South America, South Africa & the United States), it is not necessarily a time punch card as it is so much a style of wine. Argentina has the classic fruit driven, higher alcohol wines with mild outlining characteristics of New World wine. As the fifth LARGEST producer of wine in the world, what defines Argentinian wine varietal history? Layers of migration and the cultures that brought varietals to Argentina, as well as the investment in South American wines over the last thirty years.

A story of wine is not without cultures immigrating with vines. Truly, no different than that of Grenache vs Garnatxa from France to Spain and then back and forth again as the Moors battled. Yet Argentina is overseas, continents and mountains, and it is a saga in which varietals that lasted tell a story for each New World wine region. Argentina… the immediate thought is Malbec.

Familia Barberis_La Rioja, Argentina_Malbec_cropped
Familia Barberis, Malbec vineyards

That resurrected varietal from the famous six used for Bordeaux red blends made a 1990’s debut and killed it. Bordeaux, France, may produce wines with a combination of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Petit Verdot, Malbec and Carménère. Malbec is otherwise known in Cahors, France; however it is unctuous, inky, tannic… like a 1800’s sailor fresh from the sea but not ‘refreshed’ yet. (Still amazing in my opinion…) Malbec in Argentina is anything but that- it is plush with ripe plums, macerated cherries, black raspberries then layered with cocoa nibs, herbs, sometimes a hint of crushed green peppercorn. Not a surprise that the masses would devour that?! But that is not the only varietal that Argentina is successful with. These other varietals are perhaps not internationally renowned out of Argentina but definitely worth seeking out.

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Val de La Puerta, Torrontés vineyards, La Rioja

Argentina’s immigrants thrived with varietals from Old World varietals including the unique Torrontés (pictured above). Originally claimed to be Torrontés from Spain, Argentinian Torrontés is DNA proven to be a cross between native Crillo and Muscat Alexandria (hence the amazing aromatics). Torrontés is grown throughout Argentina with three different variations- Riojano, Sanjuanino and Mendocino. It is intensely aromatic with notes of lily of the valley, rose petals, honeysuckle as well as citronelle and lemon grass. Fruits of key lime, pear, kiwi (and its seeds) yet is is surprisingly refreshing with brightness and a clean acidity. Definitely worth the adventure to find and enjoy– especially with summer seafood and fresh cuisine.

Wine Folly_Argentina

Back on track to other killer varietals, the history shows that the Spanish missionaries in the late 1500’s first brought vines (Tempranillo and once thought Torrontés) to the region. Then, in the 1900’s, a new wave of varietals from Europe arrived. From Italy came Bonarda (actually Doux Noir), Sangiovese, Nebbiolo, Lambrusco & more. From France, the following influx arrived: from Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, from the Rhône, Syrah and Viognier as well as from the Loire Valley, Chenin Blanc. Escaping the phylloxera epidemic that decimated their homeland vineyards, immigrants brought not only their vines but their background in winemaking. The 1900’s were not easy times. It was not until well after the Great Depression, political conflicts, inflation (1960-70), and finally the 1990’s resurgence with investment from foreign countries in the wine regions of Argentina did the small pockets of Argentinian winemaking expand into such large production.

Val de La Puerta vineyards, La Rioja

The rise of Malbec as the glory child may be on the forefront of what people imagine Argentina to represent; however, there are many more varietals produce there that deserve your attention — classic Old World varietals and the beautiful Torrontés. Adventure to try:

  • La Puerta 2012 Alta Malbec La Rioja — Reg $16.99
  • La Puerta 2013 Malbec La Rioja — Reg $14.99
  • La Yunta Torrontés La Rioja — Reg $10.99
  • Antigal 2013 Malbec Mendoza — Reg $24.99
  • Durigutti 2013 Cabernet Franc Mendoza — Reg $16.99
  • Durigutti 2015 Malbec Mendoza — Reg $16.99
  • Martino 2014 Malbec Mendoza — Reg $21.99
  • Salentein 2016 Portillo Malbec — Reg $16.99
  • Salentein 2014 Reserve Malbec — $25.99
  • Salentein 2010 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon — $25.99

SPECIAL GUEST TASTING
Thursday, July 13th, 2017 5pm to 7pm | Carlos Bosso

  • Carlos Basso Dos Fincas Sauvignon Blanc Mendoza– Reg $12.99
  • Carlos Basso Dos Fincas Chardonnay Mendoza — Reg $12.99
  • Carlos Basso Dos Fincas Pinot Noir Mendoza — Reg $12.99
  • Carlos Basso Dos Fincas Cab/Malbec Blend Mendoza — Reg $12.99
  • Carlos Basso Dos Fincas Malbec Mendoza — Reg $12.99

Cheers!  Jaci

 

Uncharted Territories Expanding- South Africa

map_south-africa_wine-folly

To truly grasp South African wines, one has to understand why wine would be in South Africa. It’s not only a hot, intense climate, but it’s also an area of vast trade and fluctuation in populace and politics. The first vines were planted in the 1650’s in what is now South Africa. Why? Trade and government- of course!  The Dutch East India Company (DEIC) used the Southern Cape (Cape of Good Hope) as a port in between its journeys for years.  Finally, one of the captains decided that it was ridiculous not to have fresh foods and drink, so they made a “refreshment station” and farm in Constantia.  New territory, yet, as with trade, government and agriculture, it likened to awkward teen years for quite a while.

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Photo: Ansara vineyards (Stellenbosch)

South Africa is broken into five large geographical areas: Western Cape, Northern Cape, Eastern Cape, Kwazulu-Natal, and Limpopo.  Of the wine producing areas of South Africa, the majority of production is in the Western Cape. The Western Cape is a small area in the southwestern corner of the country.  The Mediterranean climate is warm, with sunny growing seasons that are thankfully cooled by the Benguela Current (aka the Cape Doctor) which flows north from Antarctica. The Cape Doctor does more than cool the coast, it also inhibits fungal disease and eases the heat off of the vines in these intensely hot areas.

South Africa’s geology is rich with history and environmental diversity as well as majestic in beauty.  The coast is protected by the plutons, dome-like intrusions of igneous magma into the earth’s crust with a coarse crystalline texture, which have eroded into hills (Paarl, Perdeberg Mountains, Darling Hills, Table Mountain and Simonsberg Mountain) that are flat and covered with sandstone. The layers of each region have individual meso-climates allowing for a vast array of varietals and growing environments.  This diversity matched with the exposure to wind and ventilation create patches of subtleties such as vineyards “hugging valley floors, clambering over hills, climbing steep mountain slopes, or tucked beneath high peaks”.

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Photo: view from Stark-Condé estate (Stellenbosch)

Of the varietals grown in South Africa, we find 26 red varietals (most popular being Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinotage and Mourvedré) and 23 white varietals (most popular are Chardonnay, Riesling, Chenin Blanc (Steen) and Sauvignon Blanc) with a history of a killer dessert wine- the liquid gold of Klein Constainia. Reds are big and bold, with subtle bacon or brine notes.  Many have heard of Pinotage- the red varietal that was created from Cinsault (then called Hermitage) and Pinot Noir in the Stellenbosch University Vicultural Center in 1925 by Abraham Izak Perold.  It is a flagship as well as the somewhat bastard child of South Africa.  Whites are full with bright fruits, medium to low acid and spicy qualities.  Chardonnay is rich, full and likens to a balance between California Sonoma and Côte Nuit when oaked.  Unoaked, it’s very similar to Macon, with a bit more acidity.  As South Africa has invested in growth and modern technology, we find excellent examples of Pinotage and award wining wines across the board.

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Photo: De Toren estate (Stellenbosch)

For wines that are exported around the world, we find that the Western Cape, specifically the Coastal region with districts of Stellenbosch, Paarl, Wellington, Franschhoek, Swartland and Darling are prevalent.  Though Stellenbosch and the Western Cape rule the current market, don’t hesitate to adventure into the other four wine region of origins!  For more details, check out this great resource.

Happy New Year!  Here is to new adventures!  Jaci

Other resources and regions detailed

Rioja| Ribera del Duero

Where Tempranillo is King

Tempranillo is an inky rich dark red varietal that excudes excellent ripe fruit and tannins, especially in hot areas.  Rioja and Ribera del Duero Spain produce tempranillo as the main red varietal (with some exceptions).

Rioja Spain

Isidro Milagro_Rioja vineyards_banner

  • located in the North Central region of Spain underneath the Pyrenees mountains and the Cantabrian Mountains. It has a mitigating river- Ebro, which runs westward to the Mediterranean sea
  • there are three sub regions have diverse terrain and climates (Alta, Alavesa and Baja). The first two are calcareous clay whereas Baja is ferrous and alluvial soils (great for Garnacha!)
  • Tempranillo primarily in addition to Garnacha, Graciano and Mazuelo (Carignan)
  • Crianza is aged 24 months prior to release with 12 months in oak; Riserva is aged 36 months prior to release with 12 months in oak
  • Historically 100% American oak, however modern techniques and the French influence (and oak) has been the shift!

Ribera del Duero Spain

  • located on the Mesata plateau of the Castilla y León region. This area is surrounded by the Cantabrian Mountains with the Duero river passing west through to Portugal and the Atlantic ocean.
  • flat and rocky terrain consists of layers of silty-clayey sand, limestone, marl and chalky concretions.
  • minimum of 75% Tempranillo, with a maximum of Garnacha.
    4. same aging requirements as Rioja
  • Vega Sicilia placed this region on the map with a fresh new style in the late 1800’s, however it was the 1980s with investment in modern technology that released the popularity valve to the world.